Portobello stroganoff, dairy or pareve
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FoodPerfect for 'meatless Mondays'

Portobello stroganoff, dairy or pareve

This stroganoff goes well with pappardelle pasta or over wide egg noodles.

Portobello stroganoff (Photo by Jessica Grann)
Portobello stroganoff (Photo by Jessica Grann)

Portobello stroganoff makes a beautiful vegetarian weeknight dinner. The mushrooms are filling and give you a meaty flavor that offsets the sour cream nicely.

You can make this recipe pareve by choosing vegan sour cream instead of dairy sour cream. It’s nice to have options, but I prefer this dish made with real sour cream.

This stroganoff goes well with pappardelle pasta or over wide egg noodles.

Add this to your list of recipes for “meatless Mondays”!

Portobello stroganoff
Serves 2-3, but can be easily doubled

Ingredients:
3 8-ounce packages (24 ounces) of small-cap portobello mushrooms, washed and chopped
1 large yellow onion, diced
2-3 large cloves of garlic, minced
¼ cup olive oil, divided
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1½ cups vegetable broth, or water with 1 teaspoon of mushroom- or pareve beef-flavored consommé powder
½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
¼ teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon of fresh or 1 teaspoon of dried thyme
½ cup sour cream or vegan sour cream
Grated Parmesan cheese, optional
Fresh chopped parsley, for garnish

Serve over pappardelle or wide egg noodles

Wash the mushrooms well and trim off the dead end of the stem. You can use the entire mushroom unless the stems are very woody (stringy.) In that case, remove the stems entirely and only chop the mushroom caps. You can cut the caps into thin slices or dice them. Diced mushrooms cook more quickly than large slices.

In a large pot, boil enough water to cook a half-pound of pasta.

In a large sauté pan, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and turn the heat to medium. Allow the oil to warm for a minute or two before adding the diced onion to the pot. Stir well and sauté for 10 minutes or until the onions are just starting to brown. If the onions are cooking too quickly, adjust the heat and stir them every minute or two.

Add the additional 2 tablespoons of olive oil to the pan and all of the mushrooms, stirring them well to get them evenly coated with oil.

Sprinkle with about 1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon of kosher salt and sauté the mushrooms for about 20 minutes, or until they are soft and can be pierced with a fork, and the cooking liquid from the mushrooms has cooked off.

Make a small well in the middle of the pan and add a touch of oil, then put the garlic and spices into the oil.

After 15 seconds, stir the garlic, thyme and pepper into the oil in small circles. As the garlic becomes fragrant, you can stir it completely into the mushrooms. I like to sprinkle this mixture with a little more salt and allow it to cook for another 2-3 minutes before adding the flour.

Add the flour to the pan and stir immediately and quickly, coating the mushrooms in the flour.

Add 1½ cups of broth (or water with consommé) to the pan and stir it until the flour is dissolved. The liquid will start to thicken. When you see consistent bubbles coming up in the sauce, stir the mushrooms well and take the pan off of the heat.

Stir in the sour cream, checking to see if it needs more salt or pepper, and cover until the pasta is finished cooking.

You can strain the pasta and serve the stroganoff on top, or you can combine the pasta into the stroganoff. If you would like to mix it before serving, you can scoop the cooked noodles directly from the cooking liquid with a strainer and add them to the mushrooms. I usually add about ¾ of the noodles and a small ladle of cooking water to help the ingredients combine, then stir in the remaining noodles.

I serve this in bowls, and it’s amazing topped with grated Parmesan cheese and a little bit of fresh parsley for color.

Bonus: You can make this recipe as is, and add 2 cups of whole milk in place of the broth and sour cream to make a beautiful, thin and milky portobello soup.

Enjoy and bless your hands! PJC

Jessica Grann is a home chef living in Pittsburgh.

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