Pittsburgh’s Race for the Cure goes remote this year
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COVID-19The race must go on

Pittsburgh’s Race for the Cure goes remote this year

The race will take place from Sept. 13–26.

Co-founders of Pittsburgh's Race for the Cure. From left: Pat Siger, Laurie Moser and Eileen Lane. Photo by Joshua Franzos Photography
Co-founders of Pittsburgh's Race for the Cure. From left: Pat Siger, Laurie Moser and Eileen Lane. Photo by Joshua Franzos Photography

Pittsburgh’s 28th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure will take place remotely from Sept. 13-26 this year, replacing the usual Mother’s Day fanfare at Schenley Park typically packed with 15,000 runners and walkers.

This year, at least 2,000 people are signed up for the virtual race so far, according to Meg Dluhos, development director for Susan G. Komen Greater Pennsylvania, and reported by the Tribune-Review.

Participants this year can walk or run on their own terms – in their own neighborhood or even on their treadmill.

Three Jewish women — Eileen Lane, Laurie Moser and Pat Siger — co-founded the Pittsburgh Race for the Cure in 1992. Moser is a breast cancer survivor.

One in eight women in the U.S. will develop breast cancer. But for women of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, the number is much higher.

Ashkenazi Jewish women disproportionately have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutation compared with the general population, with 1 in 40 Ashkenazi women carrying a BRCA mutation. Those with the mutation have an estimated risk of around 70% for developing breast cancer by age 80, according to the CDC and the National Cancer Institute.

Seventy-five percent of funds raised by Susan G. Komen Greater Pennsylvania are returned to the community in the form of breast cancer education, screening and treatment, according to the Susan G. Komen Greater Pennsylvania website. The other 25% supports research programs across the U.S.

So far, the Pittsburgh race has raised over $53,000 toward its $100,000 goal.

Sign-ups are open, and mail-in entry forms must be postmarked by Sept. 4. Those who do not want to register for the race can still make a donation to the cause via the website.

The virtual Pittsburgh ceremony will kick off at 8:30 a.m. on September 13, and participants can race remotely from then until Sept. 26. PJC

– Kayla Steinberg

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