Linda Greenberg
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Linda Greenberg

(File photo)
(File photo)

Linda Greenberg

GREENBERG: On Wednesday, March 14, 2018, Linda Greenberg, 72, of Squirrel Hill lost her 21-year battle with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother, sister, and friend. Born April 5, 1945 in Buffalo, N.Y. to Hyman and Betty (Katz) Fudeman, Linda was a kind and giving teacher whose career began in New York as a special needs educator. Her passion for teaching shifted to the arts, where she spent many years as a successful studio potter in Philadelphia, sharing her love for ceramics with students of all ages. Having always been interested in travel and cross-cultural understanding, Linda’s professional work transitioned to international education. She worked at the International Visitors Center in Philadelphia, as well as the Experiment in International Living. After moving to Pittsburgh in 1990, she began her own agency finding spots for college graduates abroad in work settings or language study. Her office was on the second floor, and when she began to experience neurological symptoms in 1997-1998, she retired. Linda enjoyed many trips to Europe for business and pleasure both alone and with her husband. Later, they learned a lot together about how to deal with a progressive and devastating neurological disease, giving it the good fight by taking advantage of adaptive technology such as a voice-operated computer. In addition to traveling, her passions were gardening and language: she loved playing Scrabble and doing crossword puzzles. Linda enjoyed a loving, 47-year marriage to James, a pediatric anesthesiologist at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. Together they raised Jenna, a cantor specializing in Jewish choral music in Dayton, Ohio, and Jeremy, a successful contract manager in Philadelphia. “Safti” loved her grandchildren, Ranon, Elior, Raya, Clyde, and Matan, who turned her house into a circus whenever they visited. Linda and James will be perpetually grateful to the amazing caregivers who helped her do all the many things she could no longer physically accomplish: Krystal, Julia, Cleo, Rachel and the wonderful nursing and rehabilitation sciences students on whom she depended. Her warmth, spirit, and soul survive her interment at Penn Forest Natural Burial Ground. Professional services by D’Alessandro Funeral Home and Crematory Ltd., Lawrenceville. Memorial contributions may be made to the Center for Assistive Technology (http://www.upmc.com/Services/rehab/rehab-institute/services/cat/Pages/default.aspx) at the University of Pittsburgh or the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Pennsylvania Keystone Chapter (https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Chapters?chapters=6545).

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